Natural Deodorants – Make Your Own with Coconut Oil

coconut oil deodorantIf you are looking for a healthier and greener alternative to regular deodorants then the simplest solution is to make your own. This may sound all too way out and crunchy granola hippy, but it’s easy and what is more important it works!

Years ago I switched from roll-ons to rock crystal deodorants, thinking that these were totally safe and free of the aluminium that makes the regular products a health worry.(Aluminium has been linked with breast cancer and Alzheimers.) Continue reading

Sunscreen: The Good The Bad and the Skin Cancer

Which sunscreen is safe to use at the beach?If you, like us, have been routinely slathering your kids with sunscreen to protect them from cancer causing skin damage, you might find this article on skin cancer research worrying.

Researchers have found that since the use of sunscreen became general in the mid-70s rates of skin cancers have increased significantly, rather than decreased as expected. One theory was that because they take longer to burn, people spend longer periods in the sun. Another that the sunscreen blocks most of the UVB rays but not so much of the UVA, which penetrates deeper into the skin.

One of the main risk factors identified here though, was some of the chemical ingredients in the sunscreens themselves. Certain of the active ingredients act as free radical generators once they are activated by the UV rays. Free radicals are the big bad wolves of the cancer world, loose cannons in the body that can cause changes in cell structure.

If you are interested in more detail, go read the original article, which is full of information and references to current research. But for easy reference here is a list of things to look out for:

Chemicals to avoid in sunscreen
Benzophenone, oxybenzone or benzophenone-3 – all free radical generators when activated by UV light. These, or derivatives of these, are found in most common chemical sunscreens.
Psoralen – high risk of melanomas shown in several studies that rate this chemical four times worse than those listed above..
Look out for these ingredients in face creams that have an SPF too.

Physical sunscreens
These use minerals such as titanium dioxide or zinc oxide and reflect the UV light away from the skin. They tend to look white on the skin. They work as sunblocks and are much safer than chemical sunscreens.

Natural tan
The article concludes  with saying that the safest protection against skin cancer is to build up a natural tan gradually without risking severe sunburn. Most severe skin damage was seen in people with infrequent but intense exposure to the sun. For example the holidaymaker from a less sunny climate who sunbathes too long and gets badly burned. Those with regular, moderate exposure to the sun are less likely to suffer from skin cancer.

Vitamin D
We all need vitamin D and our body manufactures it from the sun shining on our skin. Using sunscreens prevents this natural process. We all should spend a minimum of 10 minutes a day  in the sunshine without any blocking sunscreens on our skin, to get a basic level of vitamin D. Vitamin D helps suppress the growth of malignant melanomas and possibly other cancers too, so getting enough sunlight on our skin helps fight, rather than causes, skin cancer.

Once again it’s all about moderation, getting out in the sun and fresh air, but not overdoing it, minimising the chemicals we expose ourselves to and reading that tiny small print on the ingredients lists.

Photo: © Radu Tania | Dreamstime.com

What’s with rBST free milk labelling in South Africa today?

rBST free label South AfricarBST free milk label South AfricaUntil a few years ago I didn’t know about rBST in milk. I didn’t know that artificial hormones were permitted to be given to South African cows to raise milk production, regardless of possible ill effects to the cows and to the humans drinking the milk. As soon as I read about it here, I made sure I only bought milk labelled as rBST free. Only now the rules on labels seem to be changing.

The genetically modified growth hormone rBST (rBGH) is banned in Europe, Canada and New Zealand. It is produced by GMO giant Monsanto and there is controversy surrounding its continuing use in the US. Possible long term effects to humans from exposure to the hormone, from drinking and eating dairy products from cows treated with it, are various cancers. For the cows the side-effects are increased risk of mastitis, requiring the use of antibiotics. The hormone speeds up their metabolism, putting more stress on their systems and reducing their useful life-span.

The powers that be continue to assure us that the use of the hormone is completely safe, but other authorities stress the contrary. Who are we to believe?

In the end it comes down to making a personal choice. We should have the right to choose shouldn’t we? But since labelling regulations got stricter this becomes even more complicated.

Until recently the rBST label was to be found on several milk brands – Clover and Pick and Pay, as well as Woolworths, Fair Cape and some of the smaller dairies. However on a recent shopping trip I found that Clover and Pick and Pay no longer label their milk as rBST free. A new labelling act apparently states that suppliers must be able to prove that their milk is free of artificial hormones (cows always produce their own natural hormones so no-one can correctly state that their milk is hormone free). There is no straightforward test that can prove it, so the only way is to prove that the cows supplying the milk have never been treated with the hormone. Due to fears of court-cases, Clover and some of the bigger dairies have obviously decided not to risk using the label, though Clover still state that their milk is sourced from dairy herds that are not treated with the hormone. Woolworths and Fair Cape continue to use the label, perhaps because they feel more secure in their sources?

What makes it so difficult to investigate is that almost no-one admits to using the hormone, yet about 30% of South African dairy farmers apparently are using it, driven by economic pressure to increase their milk yields any which way they can. There is a whole fog of misinformation out there, which hasn’t been helped by the stricter labelling laws. The laws should have made things clearer and less confusing for the consumer, but have ended up with the opposite effect.

How can I tell if the milk I am buying is not labelled rBST free because of over-caution on the part of the company even though the milk probably is rBST free, or because it comes from cows that are treated with the hormone?

Do I give up and buy my own cow? Visit the local dairy that supplies my milk and insist on seeing all their records and interviewing their vet? Become a vegan and start worrying about GM corn and soy instead?

Probably I should do one of the above, but since I am just muddling along like most of us, doing my best under the circumstances, I’ll just continue to look for the rBST free label, hoping that I can trust it, and buying from small local dairies in the hope that they are more accountable than large, faceless organisations. Hope and trust… or should I get that cow?!

Edited to add: I’ve had a response from both Clover and Pick and Pay in response to my enquiry into whether their milk is still rBST free. For the record this is what they said:

PnP: “Please note all our mil is currently rBST free.  However there is no test method available for this.  In terms of the new labelling legislation and consumer protection act, if a claim is made, one needs to have the scientific evidence to support this.  We are in the process of signing an agreement with our milk suppleirs to confirm this so that we can reintroduce this logo onto our packaging.”

Clover: “Thank you for your e-mail and concern.   The reason we do not have the rBST free sign on the milk anymore is because of the new labelling act.  We are only allowed to have it on our milk if we can “prove” by testing that there are no hormones in the milk.  Unfortunately there is not one machine in the whole Africa that can test hormones in milk.

I can assure you that Clover does not use hormones on our cows.  We have written agreements with our farmers and regular inspections with a vet is made to inspect the cows if they are not injected with hormones, and also how they are treated and how they graze.”

Green Living With Herbs

Start a little patch of herbs in your garden for really green living. If you don’t have a garden, a cluster of pots on a balcony or window sill will do – herbs are generally quite hardy as long as they get enough daylight and some sun. There’s no need to get fancy – just start with the basics from the Scarborough Fair song – parsley, sage, rosemary  and thyme.
And what’s so green about growing your own herbs… besides the fact that they are green, of course!

There’s far less wastage when you grow your own herbs instead of buying packets of them at the supermarket. You just snip off exactly what you need and it’s fresh and bursting with flavour. No packaging, no leftover quantities to wilt in the fridge and you’re saving money all the way.

Herbs are full of vitamins and minerals – in fact parsley is a multi-vitamin and mineral in leaf form, so you can keep healthier by having a steady supply of fresh leaves in your cooking and on your salads. If you eat plenty  and eat healthily anyway you can probably get away without taking any further vitamin supplements (note that this is an opinion, not medical advice!)

Herb teas are good for you. Read up about the medicinal effects of parsley and rosemary, sage and thyme and you will find that you have a natural medicine chest on your doorstep – perfect for treating coughs and colds, digestive disorders, flagging energy levels and more. Here is a great post on the uses of herbs, researched from my favourite Margaret Roberts book – she is the South African authority on growing herbs and highly recommended reading if you are going to start growing them.

If you only have a small garden, start mixing up the herbs with the ornamental flowers for a pretty cottage garden effect and get the satisfaction of knowing that your garden is feeding you as well as looking beautiful.